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Viewing cable 05SANJOSE2037, ANOTHER POLL SHOWS MAJORITY OF COSTA RICANS SUPPORT

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Reference ID Created Released Classification Origin
05SANJOSE2037 2005-08-31 14:02 2011-03-03 16:04 UNCLASSIFIED Embassy San Jose
Appears in these articles:
http://www.nacion.com/2011-03-03/Investigacion/NotasDestacadas/Investigacion2697430.aspx
http://www.nacion.com/2011-03-03/Investigacion/NotaPrincipal/Investigacion2697496.aspx
http://www.nacion.com/2011-03-03/Investigacion/NotasSecundarias/Investigacion2697489.aspx
http://www.nacion.com/2011-03-03/Investigacion/NotasSecundarias/Investigacion2697532.aspx
http://www.nacion.com/2011-03-03/Investigacion/NotasSecundarias/Investigacion2697535.aspx
http://www.nacion.com/2011-03-03/Investigacion/NotasSecundarias/Investigacion2701964.aspx
http://www.nacion.com/2011-03-03/Investigacion/Relacionados/Investigacion2701965.aspx
This record is a partial extract of the original cable. The full text of the original cable is not available.
UNCLAS SECTION 01 OF 02 SAN JOSE 002037 
 
SIPDIS 
 
WHA/CEN 
EB FOR WCRAFT, BMANOGUE 
E FOR DEDWARDS 
WHA FOR WMIELE 
WHA/EPSC FOR KURS, LGUMBINER 
INR/R/AA FOR SBIRD 
H FOR JHAGAN 
STATE PASS TO USTR FOR RVARGO, AMALITO 
 
E.O. 12958: N/A 
TAGS: ETRD ECPS ECON PREL PGOV SOCI CS
SUBJECT: ANOTHER POLL SHOWS MAJORITY OF COSTA RICANS SUPPORT 
CAFTA-DR 
 
REF: (A) SAN JOSE 01787 
 
     (B) SAN JOSE 01875 
 
1.  According to a poll conducted in August 2005 by UNIMER 
for the daily "La Nacion," 54 percent of the 1,413 persons 
polled supported the U.S.-Central American-Dominican 
Republic Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA-DR), up from 43 
percent in a similar poll conducted for "La Nacion" in 
November 2004.  Twenty-six percent of those polled believe 
that the agreement should be rejected, down from 38 percent 
in November.  Seventy-six percent of those polled said that 
they were aware that the U.S. Congress already had ratified 
CAFTA-DR. 
 
2.  The poll also revealed that men support CAFTA-DR more 
than women (61.2, and 45.2 percent in favor, 21.1, and 31.1 
opposed, respectively), and a larger percentage of men 
claimed to have knowledge of the CAFTA-DR ratification 
process (80 percent for men versus 71.8 percent for women). 
Those not expressing support for or opposition to CAFTA-DR 
either had no opinion or did not believe that CAFTA-DR 
would have much of an effect.  Those respondents who live 
in the rural zones of the greater metropolitan San Jose 
area had the highest support for CAFTA-DR (66.3 percent in 
favor, and 21.0 percent against).  There are many 
agriculture-related industries in these areas, such as 
ornamental plant, coffee, and flower growers, that rely 
heavily on exports to the U.S. 
 
3.  In the urban greater metropolitan San Jose area, which 
is the most populated area and was the most represented in 
the poll with 508 total respondents, 57.1 percent expressed 
support for CAFTA-DR, and 27.7 percent expressed 
opposition.  The geographical area that showed the highest 
opposition to CAFTA-DR at approximately 30 percent was the 
Central Valley area outside of the greater metro San Jose 
area.  Forty-one percent of respondents who live in this 
area expressed support for CAFTA-DR.  The other 30 percent 
either had no opinion or did not think CAFTA-DR would make 
much of a difference. 
 
4.  Support for the agreement also varied with the 
education level of the respondent.  The higher level of 
education achieved, the stronger the support for CAFTA-DR. 
University-educated respondents showed a 58.9 percent level 
of support (27.1 percent opposed); high school graduates 
52.6 percent (26.6 percent opposed); primary school 
graduates 51 percent (24.6 percent opposed); and lower 
education levels 38.2 percent (21.5 percent opposed). 
 
5.  Also, the poll revealed that respondents from higher 
socio-economic levels were more likely to support the 
agreement than were respondents from lower socio-economic 
levels.  The poll identified that 66.4 percent of those 
respondents from a high socio-economic level favored CAFTA- 
DR (16.4 percent opposed); 52.9 percent from the medium 
socio-economic level (28.8 percent opposed); and 50.9 
percent from the low socio-economic level (22.5 percent 
opposed). 
 
6.  With regard to age groups, the under 18-year-old group 
showed the weakest support (47 percent in favor and 31.3 
percent opposed), while support was strongest among those 
between 18 and 29 years of age (59.5 percent in favor, 26.3 
percent opposed), followed by the 30-to-39 year-olds (55.9 
percent in favor, 22 percent opposed), 50-to 69-year-olds 
(47.0 percent in favor, 26.4 percent opposed), and the 40- 
to-49 (47 percent in favor, 29.4, percent opposed). 
 
7.  "La Nacion's" report on the UNIMER poll also revealed 
that one third of those polled said that a presidential 
candidate's stance on CAFTA-DR would affect how they vote in 
the next election in February 2006.  Of this third, 62 
percent said that they would be more likely to support a 
candidate who is in favor of CAFTA-DR while 34 percent said 
they would be more likely to support a candidate opposed to 
CAFTA-DR. 
 
------- 
COMMENT 
------- 
 
8.  The results from this poll are consistent with other 
polls conducted recently (Refs A and B).  A majority of 
Costa Ricans polled expressed support for CAFTA-DR, which 
has grown over the last nine months as the citizenry has 
become more informed.  This most recent poll also revealed 
that the highest level of support was from 18-29-year-old 
Costa Ricans and those who live in heavily agricultural 
areas that rely on trade with the U.S.  This is notable 
because some CAFTA-DR opponents have said that farmers 
oppose the agreement because it will hurt them and that 
young Costa Ricans, especially University students, are 
opposed to the agreement.  The results from this most recent 
poll do not support these contentions. 
FRISBIE